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Journal of Entomology and Zoology Studies
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ISSN Print: 2349-6800 | ISSN Online: 2320-7078

Journal of Entomology and Zoology Studies

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2015, Vol. 3, Issue 5
Forensic - insect succession and decomposition patterns of dog and rabbit carcasses in different habitats

Mohammed GM Zeariya, Kotb M Hammad, Mohammed A Fouda, Alaa G Al-Dali, Mohamad M Kabadaia

The entomofauna associated with two animal carcasses namely; dog (Canis lupus familiaris) and rabbit (Lepus cuniculus); and their succession patterns were investigated. This study was carried out at the Department of Zoology and Entomology, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Nasr city, Cairo, Egypt. The fresh stage of carcass decomposition began with death and ended when bloated stage was initiated. It lasted 12 h for dog and rabbit carcasses placed outdoor (Mean temperature 29 C and RH 54%), while it lasted one day and 12 h for dog and rabbit carcasses placed indoor, respectively. The bloated stage was on day one postmortem for dog and rabbit carcasses placed outdoor, while it was on day 2 and on day one postmortem for dog and rabbit carcasses placed indoor, respectively. The active decay stage was on day 4 and on day 3 postmortem for dog and rabbit carcasses placed outdoor, respectively. While it was on day 3 postmortem for each dog and rabbit indoor. The advanced decay stage arrived on day 7 and on day 5 postmortem for dog and rabbit carcasses placed outdoor, respectively. Meanwhile, it was on day 6 and on day 5 postmortem for dog and rabbit carcasses placed indoor, respectively. The final stage of decomposition (dry stage) was arrived on day 22 and on day 19 postmortem for dog and rabbit carcasses placed outdoor, respectively. While it was arrived on day 31 and on day 16 postmortem for dog and rabbit carcasses placed in door, respectively. rnA total of 687 adult insect specimens representing 9 families were collected from dog carcasses placed outdoor, while 342 adult insect specimens representing 8 families were collected from dog carcass placed indoor. Diptera, Coleoptera and Hymenoptera comprised 57%, 36% and 7% of insects collected from dog carcasses placed outdoor and 59%, 37% and 4% of insects placed indoor. The insect succession on dog and rabbit throughout the decompositional stages showed that the Calliphorid fly, Chrysomya albiceps was the first fly attracted to the early stages of decomposition. In general, it was appeared that the diversity and numbers of forensic insect species which colonize dog or rabbit carcasses were increased outdoor and decreased indoor. Moreover, they were higher in numbers on dog carcasses than on rabbit carcasses.
Pages : 473-482 | 961 Views | 56 Downloads
How to cite this article:
Mohammed GM Zeariya, Kotb M Hammad, Mohammed A Fouda, Alaa G Al-Dali, Mohamad M Kabadaia. Forensic - insect succession and decomposition patterns of dog and rabbit carcasses in different habitats. J Entomol Zool Stud 2015;3(5):473-482.
Journal of Entomology and Zoology Studies
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