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Journal of Entomology and Zoology Studies
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ISSN Print: 2349-6800 | ISSN Online: 2320-7078

Journal of Entomology and Zoology Studies

2016, Vol. 4, Issue 5
Responsive behaviour of decephalized centipedes that can survive without brain

Shehzad Zareen, Hameed Ur Rehman, Riaz Hussain, Saqib Rauf, Muhmmad Rizwan, Hira Zareen, Kausar Saeed, Waqar Ahmad and Raqeebullah, Sumbal Haleem and Faryal Saad

Centipedes belong to subphylum Myriapoda having segmented body and many jointed legs. They are considered to be highly venomous organisms with 30 to 354 legs. Word “Centi” means “hundred” but they don’t have hundred legs in fact. It was beheaded by a blade on the floor. Semi-dead body was observed on the spot. Later on its body was transfer into a glass container. About 22 segment long 10cm Centipede with 21 pair of legs was the subject of this study. Centipede was beheaded by a sharp blade at its 7th segment. Cephalic segments along with 6 segments of trunk were removed ensuring that brain was completely removed from centipede’s body. Both cut parts were keenly observed by researchers. This study unlocked an amazing fact about centipedes that a decephalized / beheaded centipede can stay alive for more than 14 hours if it is protected from the attack of ants or other predators. Even after removal of its head a centipede can move swiftly and find grooves / burrows to hide. This search is carried out by its touch-sensitive body, which was confirmed in this study. A beheaded centipede has ability to attack even without brain with its rear pair of legs as they include stick poisonous substance, which can be injected to the body of attacker.
Pages : 184-186 | 1042 Views | 21 Downloads
How to cite this article:
Shehzad Zareen, Hameed Ur Rehman, Riaz Hussain, Saqib Rauf, Muhmmad Rizwan, Hira Zareen, Kausar Saeed, Waqar Ahmad, Raqeebullah, Sumbal Haleem, Faryal Saad. Responsive behaviour of decephalized centipedes that can survive without brain. J Entomol Zool Stud 2016;4(5):184-186.
Journal of Entomology and Zoology Studies
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